Mellon Postdocs

Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows in Dance Studies 2015-16

Rachel Carrico –  Stanford
Rachel Carrico holds a Ph.D. in Critical Dance Studies from the University of California–Riverside and an M.A. in Performance Studies from NYU. Her research explores the aesthetic, political, and social histories of second lining, an African diaspora dance form rooted in New Orleans’s black parading traditions. Carrico’s scholarship has been published in TDR: The Drama Review, awarded the Society of Dance History Scholars’ Selma Jeanne Cohen Award, and supported by grants from such entities as the UC President’s Dissertation Year Fellowship Program, the UC Center for New Racial Studies, and the Center for Gulf South Research at Tulane University. Also a practitioner, Carrico recently completed the Limón Institute’s teacher training. In 2008, she co-founded Goat in the Road Productions in New Orleans, with whom she has directed two international artist residencies and launched Play/Write, a youth playwriting festival, in New Orleans schools. Carrico is also a contributor to New Orleans’s Data News Weekly and a consultant for the forthcoming documentary film, Buckumpin‘, on New Orleans vernacular dance. She parades annually with the Ice Divas Social and Pleasure Club.

Amanda Graham – Northwestern
Amanda Jane Graham is the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Dance Studies at Northwestern University, where she teaches between Dance, Art History, and the Kaplan Institute for the Humanities. Graham has her MA and PhD in Visual and Cultural Studies from the University of Rochester, a MA in Communication and Culture from York University, and a MS in Education from Brooklyn College. Graham’s dissertation, “The Myth of Movement: Trisha Brown and Lucinda Childs Dancing on the New York City Grid, 1970-1980” examines post-Judson site-situated choreography representative of Manhattan’s shifting economic, political, and architectural landscape. Derived from her dissertation, Graham’s current book project Dance on Display: A Performance History of the Visual Art Museum investigates dance’s ambivalent history with art museums (1930-present). She has published articles on dance, visual art, and culture and media in academic journals including Dance Chronicle, Latin American Perspectives, and InVisible Culture.

Noemie Solomon – Brown
Noémie Solomon is Andrew W. Mellon postdoctoral fellow in Dance Studies at Brown University. Previously, she was Mellon Postdoctoral fellow in the English department at McGill University, where she researched dance in Québec after 1948 around questions of movement, minority, and belonging. She holds a PhD in Performance Studies from New York University where her dissertation, Unworking the Dance Subject, was awarded the Michael Kirby Memorial Prize for Distinguished Doctoral Dissertation in 2012. She edited DANSE: An Anthology and DANSE: A Catalogue, which gather key texts on contemporary choreography across French and English languages (Les Presses du réel, 2014; 2015). She initiated and collaborated on a series of dramaturgical and curatorial initiatives in the dance field internationally, including: Dance on Time (iDANS, Istanbul, 2009); Self-Methodologies (Tanzquartier, Vienna, 2011); the Photomusée de la danse (Festival d’Avignon, 2011); Solos and Solitudes (Danspace Project, NYC, 2012-13); Dancing is talking / Talking is dancing (MoMA PS1, NYC, 2014).

 

Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows in Dance Studies 2014-15
Joanna Dee Das –  Stanford
Amanda Graham – Northwestern
Noemie Solomon – Brown

Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows in Dance Studies 2013-14
Jose Luis Reynoso – Northwestern
Brandon Shaw – Brown

Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows in Dance Studies 2012-13
Jason Bush – Stanford
Jose Luis Reynoso – Northwestern
Brandon Shaw – Brown

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