CFP: Michael Jackson: Artist, Advocate, Provocateur

We are seeking proposals for a multi-disciplinary collection of essays on Michael Jackson as a creative and political force.

Serious analysis of the cultural and political meanings of Jackson’s art has lagged behind an inordinate focus on his private life and personality.  We seek thoughtful writing that moves beyond familiar narratives-informed arguments, never before published, that focus on Jackson’s artistry and strategies for social change. Our goals are 1) to move the conversation into new places, taking up new questions for new audiences, and 2) to produce a volume in which scholars, cultural critics, and other thinkers from inside and outside academia speak together, charting directions for Jackson studies in the future.  We welcome a variety of points of view and standards of value.

Send one-page abstracts and one-paragraph professional biographies to Toni  Bowers and Willa Stillwater at SubmissionsBowersStillwater@english.upenn.edu by October 15, 2015.  We’ll select proposed essays and assemble a Table of Contents by the end of the calendar year.  Early in 2016, we’ll send a details proposal, including abstracts, to a university press or rigorous academic trade publisher.  Final essays of approximately 9000 words (20 pages) will be due in early June 2016.

Toni Bowers, PhD, is Professor of British Literature at the University of Pennsylvania.  She has published four books and dozens of articles on literary and cultural subjects, including “Dancing with Michael Jackson” (Los Angeles Review of Books, May 14, 2015).

Willa Stillwater, PhD, is the author of “Monsters, Witches, and Michael Jackson’s Ghosts” (Popular Musicology Online, January 8, 2015) and M Poetica: Michael Jackson’s Art of Connection and Defiance (Kindle 2011).

Search: Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows in Dance Studies

Call for Applications

A consortium of three research universities–Brown, Northwestern, and Stanford–seeks to appoint Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows in Dance Studies for the academic year 2016-17. Fellows will be associated with departments of dance/theatre/performance studies and with humanities centers on each campus and will teach two undergraduate courses. International applicants are welcome, as are applicants from Ph.D.s in all fields in the humanities and humanistic social sciences that border dance studies.

The initial appointment is for one year, renewable for a second year. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. no later than 15 July 2016 and no earlier than 15 July 2013. Campus placement will be determined by the Search Committee.

Please send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, writing sample, a sample syllabus for an introductory course in dance studies, and three letters of recommendation to Dance Studies Search Committee, Northwestern University, University Hall 215, 1897 Sheridan Road, Evanston IL 60208-2240. Electronic applications (in Word or pdf) may be emailed to project assistant Jennifer Britton (j-britton@northwestern.edu) with the subject line “HDance Studies Search.” AA/EOE. Northwestern is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer of all protected classes including veterans and individuals with disabilities. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Hiring is contingent upon eligibility to work in the United States.

Deadline for applications is 1 January 2016.

CFP for Performing the Progressive Era, A Collection of Essays

Performing the Progressive Era: 

Immigration, Urbanism, and Nationalism on Stage, 1890-1920

             In The Spirit of Youth and the City Streets (1909), reformer and settlement house director Jane Addams laments the temptations and travails of modern urban life, especially the lack of access for working class and immigrant families to institutions that promote the “conception of life higher than that which the actual world offers them.” Integral to Addams’s argument is the institution of theater, which she describes in terms of character-building and national-development by quoting from an anonymous English playwright: “The theater is literally making the minds of our urban populations today. It is a huge factory of sentiment, of character, of points of honor, of conceptions of conduct, of everything that finally determines the destiny of a nation. The theater is not only a place of amusement, it is a place of culture, a place where people learn how to think, act, and feel.” Accepting this premise uncritically, Addams nevertheless warns against those entertainments that constituted a “debased form of dramatic art,” which could only corrupt the innocence and morality of the youth by promoting unethical assumptions and behaviors, a common complaint among theater and social critics of the Progressive Era. Addams yearned for an appropriate theater that could show “life lived in efflorescence;” a theatre that would ennoble the youth of working-class and immigrant families, and therein, the country.  In effect, Addams sought the high/low binary that David Savran has shown developed during the 1920s, with high-culture theater of Eugene O’Neill and the subsequent Little Theatre Movement, sermons, and settlement-house plays correcting the troubling influence of melodramas, musical halls, and burlesque.

Addams’s conception evinces a disorganized and overlapping theatrical landscape that was specific to the Progressive Era. A commingling of genre, aesthetic, and ideological trappings that produced a theatre that defined (and was defined by) the nation’s emergent urban life. This is perhaps best encapsulated by Frederic Jameson’s definition of modernism as “the co-existence of realities from radically different moments in history.” The Progressive Era was, for the most part, a confluence of new and old, high and low. At the same time, perhaps fortunately for Addams, the Progressive Era represented what Dorothy Chansky has called a “sea change in social behavior enabled not only by the innovations of self-proclaimed rebels, but by widespread, systematic shifts allowing a broad based accommodation of the new rhetoric by many Americans.” This anthology examines the theatre’s role in promulgating and legitimizing these changes. In what ways did theatre—high and low— instigate changes in local and national identities as they relate to questions of class, ethnicity, sexuality, temperance, etc.? In what ways did theater—high and low—work in conjunction to influence how theatergoers thought, acted, and felt?  By taking up Addams’s claim about the competition and comingling of Broadway, working-class, immigrant, settlement house, and variety theatres, this anthology examines the ways that thinkers, artists, reformers, and entrepreneurs willed a new chapter of modernity into existence out of the raw material of this decidedly chaotic period of U.S. history.

We welcome submissions that examine the theatre’s role as a “factory” of modernity, both locally and nationally. This might include consideration of social concerns such as the Settlement House Movement, the Social Purity Movement, Temperance Societies, Immigration, Nativism, etc. This might also include exploration of the many theatrical genres discussed here as they relate to the larger project of modernism.

Editors – J. Chris Westgate, CSU Fullerton & Max Shulman, Tufts University

SUBMISSION DETAILS/DEADLINES

  • Final essays will be between 8,000-10,000 words.
  • Please send abstracts of 250 words to J. Chris Westgate at jcwestgate@Exchange.fullerton.edu.
  • Please include a short bio with abstracts.
  • Abstract Submission Deadline: December 1st, 2015

Dance Studies in/and the Humanities seeks Postdoc for 2015-2016

The Mellon-funded initiative Dance Studies in/and the Humanities invites applications for a one-year postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University starting 1 September 2015. As a member of the Department of Theater and Performance Studies, the Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow in Dance Studies will teach two courses, one an introductory course in dance studies and the other an upper-division special-topics course. In addition, the postdoctoral fellow will organize programs open to the community and designed to advocate for dance studies within the arts and humanities.

To apply, please send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, writing sample, sample syllabus, and two letters of recommendation to Jennifer Britton, administrator for Dance Studies in/and the Humanities at j-britton@northwestern.edu. Electronic applications should be in Word or PDF with the subjectline “HDance Studies Search.” Postal applications should be directed to:

Dance Studies Search Committee
Northwestern University
University Hall 215
1897 Sheridan Road
Evanston IL 60208-2240

Applicants must  have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. no later than July 15, 2015 and no earlier than July 15, 2012. AA/EOE. Women andminorities are encouraged to apply.

Deadline for applications is 15 May 2015. Applicants should be available to attend the Mellon Summer Seminar in Dance Studies June 21-27, 2015 at Northwestern University.

Stanford seeking ITALIC Lecturer

Position Title

ITALIC Lecturer

Location

Stanford University Main Campus

Position Description

Working closely with the teaching team of three Stanford faculty, the program’s Assistant Director, and one other lecturer, the ITALIC lecturer will lead two discussion sections of 15 students per quarter and offer individualized instruction to his/her students. The lecturer will work with freshmen in probing the nature of artistic and aesthetic invention, discovery and issues.

 

Through a series of close investigations and analyses of major works and ideas of the visual, performing and filmic arts, as well as less considered instances of the aesthetic in everyday life, this three-quarter class will question what the cultivation of aesthetic perception, analysis, art making skills and experience in art can bring to creativity and perception in important areas of human endeavor outside of art.

 

Initial appointments are for a term of one year with a start date of September 1, 2015. The position may be renewable for additional years should the pilot program be continued beyond the start-up period. Salary and full benefits package is competitive.

 

Qualifications

The successful candidate will demonstrate excellence in college-level teaching, both in small seminar style classes as well as larger lectures. Must be sensitive to the particular demands of teaching freshmen in a year-long, residence-based course, and committed to effective, engaging pedagogy. Exceptional communication skills and experience in working collaboratively and in team-taught courses is also highly desirable. Evidence of distinction in relevant scholarship and research and (if relevant) arts practice, is required. The successful candidate will hold a Ph.D., M.F.A, M.A., or DMA in one of the Arts or affiliated fields (e.g. Art History, Cultural Studies, American Studies, Music, Dance Studies, Film Studies, and related arts and humanities disciplines), conferred no later than June 2015.

About Stanford University

 Stanford University, located between San Francisco and San Jose in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley, is one of the world’s leading teaching and research universities. Since its opening in 1891, Stanford has been dedicated to finding solutions to big challenges and to preparing students for leadership in a complex world.

To apply for the ITALIC Lecturer position, please visit: http://apply.interfolio.com/28468.

Stanford University is an equal employment opportunity and affirmative action employer and is committed to recruiting and hiring qualified women, minorities, protected veterans and individuals with disabilities.

Applications for the 2015 Summer Seminar are now being accepted!

MELLON DANCE STUDIES SEMINAR 2015

Applications from advanced graduate students, recent Ph.D.s, and junior faculty are invited for an intensive summer seminar on interdisciplinary research and teaching in dance studies. Funded by the Mellon Foundation, the seminar will be held June 21-27, 2015 at Northwestern University. Participants will engage with each other’s work as well as with the work of invited senior scholars. Accepted applicants will have their costs covered for tuition, room and board and, in addition, receive up to $500 to cover travel expenses. International applicants are welcome, as are applicants from all fields in the humanities and humanistic social sciences that border dance studies.

Please send a cover letter stating your research and teaching interests, curriculum vitae, writing sample, and two letters of recommendation to Dance Studies Seminar Committee, Northwestern University, University Hall 215, 1897 Sheridan Road, Evanston IL 60208-2240. Electronic applications (in Word or pdf) may be emailed to project assistant Jennifer Britton (j-britton@northwestern.edu) with the subject line “Dance Studies Seminar.” Deadline for applications is January 16, 2015.

The 2015 summer seminar is part of a multi-year initiative titled Dance Studies in/and the Humanities. A Mellon-funded partnership between three universities—Brown, Northwestern and Stanford—Dance Studies in/and the Humanities invests in emerging scholars in a growing field.

Search- Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows for 2014-15

Applications now being accepted for Mellon Dance Studies 2014-15 Postdoctoral Fellows

A consortium of three research universities—Brown, Northwestern, and Stanford—seeks to appoint Mellon Postdoctoral Fellows in Dance Studies for the academic year 2014-15. Fellows will be associated with humanities centers on each campus and will teach two undergraduate courses. In addition, fellows will attend intensive week-long seminars, held the summer before and after the fellowship year, devoted to strategies for interdisciplinary research and teaching. International applicants are welcome, as are applicants from Ph.D.s in all fields in the humanities and humanistic social sciences that border dance studies.

The initial appointment is for one year, renewable for a second year. Applicants must have completed all requirements for the Ph.D. no later than July 15, 2014 and no earlier than July 15, 2011. Campus placement and departmental affiliation will be determined by the Search Committee.

Please send a cover letter, curriculum vitae, writing sample, a sample syllabus for an introductory course in dance studies, and three letters of recommendation to Dance Studies Search Committee, Northwestern University, University Hall 215, 1897 Sheridan Road, Evanston IL 60208-2240. Electronic applications (in Word or pdf) may be emailed to project assistant Jennifer Britton (j-britton@northwestern.edu) with the subject line “Dance Studies Search.” AA/EOE. Women and minorities are encouraged to apply. Deadline for applications is December 15, 2013.

Search – Mellon Dance Studies Summer Seminar 2014

Applications now being accepted for Mellon Dance Studies Summer Seminar 2014 at Stanford

Applications from advanced graduate students, recent Ph.D.s, and junior faculty are invited for an intensive summer seminar on interdisciplinary research and teaching in dance studies. Funded by the Mellon Foundation, the seminar will be held June 22-28, 2014 at Stanford University. Participants will engage with each other’s work as well as with the work of invited senior scholars. Accepted applicants will have their costs covered for tuition, room and board and, in addition, receive up to $500 to cover travel expenses.  International applicants are welcome, as are applicants from all fields in the humanities and humanistic social sciences that border dance studies.

Please send a cover letter stating your research and teaching interests, curriculum vitae, writing sample, and two letters of recommendation to Dance Studies Seminar Committee, Northwestern University, University Hall 215, 1897 Sheridan Road, Evanston IL 60208-2240. Electronic applications (in Word or pdf) may be emailed to project assistant Jennifer Britton (j-britton@northwestern.edu) with the subject line “Dance Studies Seminar.” Deadline for applications is January 15, 2014.

The 2014 summer seminar is part of a multi-year initiative titled Dance Studies in/and the Humanities. A Mellon-funded partnership between three universities—Brown, Northwestern and Stanford—Dance Studies in/and the Humanities invests in emerging scholars in a growing field. Subsequent summer seminars will be held at Northwestern (2015).